FanDuel to Pay Out on Erroneous Tickets

FanDuel to Pay Out on Erroneous Tickets

According to an Associated Press report, FanDuel will pay out more than $82,000 on an erroneous sports betting ticket. New Jersey’s Anthony Prince on Tuesday shared his story with local media, saying he placed an in-game wager on the Denver Broncos to beat the Oakland Raiders when the Broncos were down with 1 minute, 10 seconds to play. He placed his bet at the FanDuel Sportsbook at the Meadowlands, and the printed ticket showed +75000, when it should have showed -600. The cashier did not catch the error and after the Broncos won by a point on a last-second field goal, Prince tried to collect.

Initially, FanDuel declined to pay Prince, but after investigating, on Thursday announced that it would make good on not only Prince’s bet, but on several others made during the same time span.

The company reportedly decided to pay because it said “sports betting is supposed to be fun.”

According to FanDuel, the ticket that should have been generated would have shown that Prince had to bet $600 to win $100. Instead, his $110 bet is now good for a total payout of $82,610. On Sunday, when FanDuel declined to pay on the ticket, it reportedly offered Prince $500 and tickets to several NFL New York Giants games, but he declined. The company then opened an investigation, though its rules clearly state that erroneous tickets will be paid out at the “correct odds.”

NJ Man Says FanDuel Won’t Pay; Company Investigating

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A New Jersey man says he made a wager on Sunday at the FanDuel SportsBook at the Meadowlands Racetrack and that FanDuel won’t pay up. The bet, an in-game wager, would have paid $82,610 on a $110 wager and was made with 1 minute, 10 seconds remaining in the Denver Broncos-Oakland Raiders contest.

According to a report from News12 in New Jersey, FanDuel says the ticket was a glitch and is looking into the matter. But the bettor, Anthony Prince, is all but demanding FanDuel pay out immediately.

“They said their system had a glitch in it and they’re not obligated to pay for glitches,” Prince told News12. “The other guy said, ‘You should take what we give you because we don’t have to give you [anything] at all.’ I said, ‘Wow, for real?’”

 

Read more NJ Man Says FanDuel Won’t Pay; Company Investigating on SportsHandle.

Pro Sports Leagues Continue Full-Court Press on West Virginia Sports Betting Law

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What’s going on in West Virginia? Sports betting kicked off with a bang a the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races late last month, and just last week, the FanDuel Sportsbook at The Greenbrier Resort took its first bet. In between, the state’s lottery director inexplicably resigned and now the lottery’s managing general counsel, Danielle Boyd, isn’t immediately responding to inquiries.

And on Monday, acting lottery director Doug Buffington went before the Standing Joint Committee on Finance and fielded questions about the implementation the state’s sports betting law. The lottery rolled out “emergency rules” in order to allow the casinos to open their sportsbooks, but those rules were open to public comment and the lottery must address concerns. The public-comment period ended Sept. 7 and the lottery has yet to respond.

In fact, should it respond in the near future, it will do so without its long-time leader, Alan Harrick, who resigned unexpectedly and Boyd, who has reportedly been forced out of her position by the governor’s office.

Read more Pro Sports Leagues Continue Full-Court Press on West Virginia Sports Betting Law on SportsHandle.

The Greenbrier’s FanDuel Sportsbook Opens Ahead of NFL Week 2

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West Virginia’s second legal sportsbook opened on Thursday when the the FanDuel Sportsbook at the The Greenbrier Resort and Casino took its first sports bet. The Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races opened Aug. 30.  The timing means the sportsbook is open in time for the second weekend of the NFL season. The Greenbrier is a unique circumstance in that is the only private membership-only casino in the U.S.  Only members and resort guests can enter the casino.

The Greenbrier, one of the most storied resorts in America, has long offered casino gaming at its Casino Club, a posh, high-end gaming venue. The FanDuel Sportsbook is more of the same with club chairs and 21 large-screen televisions. According to the sportsbook’s webpage, it will offer international dining options as well as live entertainment. Patrons are required to wear coats (men) and dresses (women) in the casino after 7 p.m.

Membership to the Casino Club is available through a membership to The Greenbrier Golf and Tennis Club, which costs $1,590 annually, by purchasing a home in The Greenbrier Sporting Club, or to registered hotel guests and, in some cases, convention attendees. The Casino Club opened in 2010.

Read more of The Greenbrier’s FanDuel Sportsbook Opens Ahead of NFL Week 2 on SportsHandle.

Veteran Oddsmaker Explains ‘Integrity Monitoring’ From Sportsbook Perspective

The post Veteran Oddsmaker Explains ‘Integrity Monitoring’ From Sportsbook Perspective appeared first on SportsHandle.

This is the second of a two-part series seeking to answer, “So What the Heck Is ‘Integrity Monitoring’, Anyway?” (Read Part I here.)

Even before the United States Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) in May, the NBA and Major League Baseball began lobbying state legislatures for funds to finance “integrity monitoring” measures. Part of the leagues’ claim is that expanded legal wagering will create new, greater obligations for sports leagues. 

But what exactly is “integrity monitoring,” and how are bookmakers perceiving the leagues’ efforts to garner an “integrity fee?” In the first installment of this series, we spoke to Jennifer Roberts, Associate Director of the International Center for Gaming Regulation, a gaming lawyer and adjunct professor at University of Nevada Las Vegas, who teaches such courses as fundamentals of casino operations management.

Here, to get the behind-the-counter perspective, we spoke to Robert Walker, who heads up sportsbook operations for USBookmaking. Walker’s resume also includes nearly 12 years as the director of race and sportsbook operations for MGM Mirage in Las Vegas, and before that served as the race and sportsbook manager for The Stardust.

 

Read more Veteran Oddsmaker Explains ‘Integrity Monitoring’ From Sportsbook Perspective on SportsHandle.

SuperBook to Announce Expansion Details in Nevada and Beyond

The post SuperBook to Announce Expansion Details in Nevada and Beyond appeared first on SportsHandle.

Paragon Gaming will take its “SuperBook” brand on the road, and expand beyond the company’s Westgate Las Vegas Casino & Resort, Jay Kornegay, the Westgate SuperBook’s Vice President of Race and Sports Operations told Sports Handle on Thursday. A formal announcement will be made Sept. 5., but the plan is to take the SuperBook brand to locations throughout Nevada as well as other states that have legalized sports betting, and possibly those that are heading in that direction.

“We’re separating ourselves from (the Westgate name), and we’re looking to go into other states and will operate as ‘SuperBook,’” Kornegay said. “So it would be like, ‘the SuperBook at Del Mar,’ for example. We’ve been working on this for months.”

While Kornegay wouldn’t specify where outside of the Nevada that Paragon is looking at expansion, he did say that the company has been talking to potential partners “on a daily basis.” He went on to say that he’d expect the first independent SuperBook to open within a few months. Deals are already in place with several Nevada locations, and the company continues to talk with operators in other states.

SuperBook Will Expand Its Sports Betting Expertise From Las Vegas to Other Parts of Nevada, and States With Legalized Sports Betting.

According to a story in the Las Vegas Journal-Review earlier this month, Kornegay will run the show along with Geno Iafrate, the former Westgate general manager, who will now have an executive spot in the new company, which will be be a part of the Westgate empire.

“There will be a huge market swarming to these new, legal sports books, spreading across the country,” Kornegay told the Journal-Review. “I feel the expansion of sports gaming will follow the same path as the cellphone business. It’s infant stages in this country now, but we’ll see sports gaming options almost on every corner someday. It’ll be like the U.K., where they’re as common as barbershops.”

 

SuperBook would join companies like William Hill,  which has signed deals to operate sportsbooks for existing casinos in states that have legalized sports betting since the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act was deemed unconstitutional in May. William Hill has been running the sportsbook at New Jersey’s Monmouth Park since the Garden State took its first sports bet earlier this summer. It also has deals in place in Mississippi and West Virginia, which will kick off sports betting Saturday. In addition, William Hill will partner with IGT to run the sportsbooks in Rhode Island, when sports betting begins. IGT will provide the sports wagering platform.

To read the rest of this article, visit SportsHandle using the link below:

Schumer Joins Hatch in Pushing for Federal Sports Betting Framework

Happy Anniversary! First Month of New Jersey Sports Betting In The Books

The post Happy Anniversary! First Month of New Jersey Sports Betting In The Books appeared first on SportsHandle.
Saturday will mark one month since New Jersey sports betting began in the Garden State, and the state has plenty of reason to celebrate the past month and look forward to the months and years ahead.
Governor Phil Murphy placed the state’s first official bet at Monmouth Park Sportsbook on June 14 as cameras clicked and a big crowd watched. Ninety minutes south, NBA legend Dr. J placed the first sports bet at the Borgata Race & Sportsbook in Atlantic City. Both venues claimed a first – Monmouth Park was the first New Jersey racetrack to accept a sports bet and the Borgata was the first New Jersey casino to do the same.
In the first month, there have been some key changes at Monmouth Park to accommodate the flow of sports bettors. The William Hill-run sportsbook had six teller windows at launch, which didn’t turn out to be enough: 15 additional windows have been added, in addition to 50 high-definition televisions, food carts, chairs and tables, in the grandstand area at the racetrack.
To Accommodate NJ Sports Betting Interest At Monmouth Park, The Facility Has Transformed the Grandstand
“That was a dead grandstand area,” said Tom Luicci, media manager for Monmouth Park. “If you’re facing the track, it’s on the far left side and now all of a sudden it’s probably the most vibrant area on the track. … It’s like a whole community that just sprung up out of a desert area.”
Luicci also said that the track has accommodated sports fans by opening its gates early — 8 a.m. vs. the traditional 11-11:30 a.m. opening times for horse racing — during the World Cup, so fans could place bets and watch games.
Similar scenes have likely been playing out at other venues. And there’s plenty of glory and goodwill – and money, it turns out, to be shared around the state.
“The initial sports wagering results illustrates the popularity among patrons and the potential of this new revenue stream for New Jersey operators,” said DGE Deputy Chief of financial investigations Christopher Glaum. “The Division anticipates continued revenue growth in future months as each of the state’s remaining 11 eligible sports wagering operators determines when and how they will seek to enter the marketplace.”

Maybe 14 Is New Jersey’s Lucky Number: PASPA Overturned May 14, NJ Sports Betting Opened June 14, and Meadowlands Will Take First Bets July on 14.

After nearly a decade of legal wrangling, New Jersey finally won the right for it – and every other state in the nation – to offer sports betting when the Supreme Court issued its decision on May 14, striking down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act in its Murphy v. NCAA decision.

Governor Phil Murphy placing the first legal sports wager in New Jersey at Monmouth Park.
Governor Phil Murphy placing the first legal sports wager in New Jersey at Monmouth Park.

The 14th has become an auspicious date for New Jersey since. It was on June 14 that Monmouth Park and the Borgata took those first sports bets, and it will be on July 14 that the Meadowlands, just over the border from New York City, will open for sports betting.
If the initial numbers are any indication, the Meadowlands should be in for some good business. The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement released numbers from the first 17 days of sports betting at three locations (though the Ocean Resort didn’t open until June 28, so most of the money in the report flowed through Monmouth and the Borgata), they revealed a healthy interest in sports betting.
As in Delaware sports betting, New Jersey is using a cash method of accounting, not the accrual method used in Nevada. With that understanding, the sportsbooks generated in a collective $3,458,688 gross revenue, producing $293,863 in tax revenue for the state of New Jersey. That’s based on a total handle of $16.4 million from June 14-30.
The nearly $300,000 for New Jersey’s coffers is based on an 8.5 percent tax rate on operators’ sports wagering revenue. Considering that the state set the tax for mobile sports betting at 13 percent, it stands to bring in even more once mobile wagering is online, and certainly once more properties begin operations in the coming months. Those expected to do so include the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Atlantic City and the Golden Nugget.
Several properties are planning to debut mobile platforms later this summer and bettors in the state of New Jersey will be able to sign up for an account remotely.

Current New Jersey Sportsbooks are Bare Bones, But Operators Have Plans for More Posh Surroundings, Hopefully in Time for Football Season. 

As sports betting grows in New Jersey, so, too, will its sportsbooks. Monmouth Park, the Borgata and Ocean Resort all opened with what they called “temporary” sportsbooks. 
Essentially, there’s betting windows, odds boards and a few televisions in Spartan surroundings. The idea was to get up and running as soon as possible, and based on the numbers, all of the sportsbooks bet right – bettors were more interested in being able to place bets than needing the creature comforts of a Las Vegas-style sportsbook. But during the first month, and beyond, all three properties have continued work on more elaborate sportsbooks, and hope to have those open by the start of football season.
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